Now I lay me down to sleep

A few weeks ago Eric Dirksen from Christ Church of Davis in Davis, California, spoke at Trinity CRC. His text was Acts 7, the stoning of Stephen. How Stephen met his death inspires me in how I live.

As Stephen is dying, he is overheard praying, “Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.” Eric pointed out a couple things about this prayer. First, this is the same thing Jesus prays just before He died on the cross: “Father, into Your hands I commit my spirit.” Stephen is so Christlike he imitates Jesus to the very end.

The second thing Eric pointed out is that Jesus did not make up this prayer. It comes from Psalm 31, where the psalmist originally prayed:

Into your hand I commit my spirit;
you have redeemed me, O LORD, faithful God.
(verse 5, NRSV)

It turns out that this was (and perhaps remains?) an ancient bedtime prayer for Jewish children. I picture little children rubbing their eyes as they crawl under the blankets and reciting these words. It’s similar to a bedtime prayer Eric learned when he was a child – as did I:

Now I lay me down to sleep,
I pray the Lord my soul keep.
If I should die before I wake,
I pray the Lord my soul to take.
(attributed to Joseph Addison, 1711)

I cannot help but notice how the author of Acts records Stephen’s death soon after he recites Psalm 31 as his prayer: “When he had said this, he fell asleep.” The idea of sleeping is sometimes used in the Bible to describe death. How appropriate to use this expression for the man who just uttered his bedtime prayer one last time! The prayer he may have regularly prayed before falling asleep each night is the same prayer on his lips before his final sleep and moments before he opens his eyes in new life in Jesus’ presence!

This inspires me in a couple ways. First, I want to be so saturated in the Bible that my dying words echo truth and comfort from that Word. Second, I don’t think I have to wait until my dying breath to commit my spirit (or my mind or my life) to Jesus. As Eric pointed out, I can practice praying this prayer every day. Jesus invites me to entrust every aspect of my life to His direction and care. I believe it’s the best way to spend every waking moment until the last time I fall asleep.

Prayer graphic found via Google

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Falling asleep while praying

Sleeping cat photo found via Google

From time to time, Monica or I (you’ll have to guess who) am asleep by the time the other is done praying at bedtime. Sometimes we chuckle about it. Sometimes it makes us feel guilty.

Then I read this in Kevin G. Harney’s book Seismic Shifts (it’s a long quote but worth reading)…

Seismic Shifts by Kevin G. Harney[This is] a picture that captures the heart of prayer. It comes from a confession I have heard many Christians make over the years: “I feel guilty because there are many evenings I try to pray but end up falling asleep right in the middle of my prayer time.” These people feel they let God down each time they doze off be­fore uttering their official Amen for the day.

This is what I tell them, and I hope it speaks to your heart.

Imagine a mother cradling her 5-year-old girl in her arms. It is the end of the day, and the two are talking. The mom is telling her about the plans for tomorrow. The little girl is talking about the fun she had that day. As the daughter talks, she yawns and rubs her eyes. They keep chatting, but the little girl is fading quickly. The mother looks down at the one she loves so tenderly. As they are talking, in midsentence, her little girl falls asleep, right in her arms.

How does the mother feel? Is she angry? Disappointed?

As the mother looks on her precious daughter, she smiles and rejoices. There is no other place she would rather have her little girl fall asleep.

When we end our day with God and we happen to doze off, he is not angry or disappointed. He holds us in his arms, embraces us, and gives us a kiss on the forehead. God loves to be with us, to speak to us, and hear what is on our hearts. And if we happen to fall asleep in his arms, it brings joy to his heart. There is no better place for us to end a busy day.
(pages 95-96)

Granted, if I consistently fall asleep while praying because talking with God has become boring or I consign him only the final few drowsy moments of a too-busy day, it might be a good idea to rethink my prayer habits. However, if I fall asleep in the loving and familiar embrace of our Father’s love, well, what father won’t be filled with deep satisfaction and joy?

I think also of how sleep (and sleeping securely in safety) is a gift for which the psalmist prays (here and here). I like imagining God answering that request even before the psalmist is finished asking for it!

I wrote this column for The Rock Valley Bee.
It combines a couple of popular blog posts I wrote
soon after I started blogging.

Still falling asleep while praying

After a year and a bit of blogging, a “4th Point” post that consistently gets lots of hits each month is the one I wrote about falling asleep while praying in which I quote from Kevin G. Harney’s book Seismic Shifts.  Brennan Manning also has something to say on the subject in his book The Furious Longing of God.

After referring to the intimacy and trust that’s implicit in calling God our “Abba” (“Father”), Mr. Manning writes…

Is your own personal prayer life characterized by the simplicity, childlike candour, boundless trust, and easy familiarity of a little one crawling up in Daddy’s lap?  An assured knowing that the daddy doesn’t care if the child falls asleep, starts playing with toys, or even starts chatting with little friends, because the daddy knows the child has essentially chosen to be with him for that moment?  Is that the spirit of your interior prayer life? (p. 44)

Granted, if we consistently fall asleep while praying because talking with God is boring or we consign Him only the final few drowsy moments of a too-busy day, we need to re-examine our praying.  However, if we fall asleep in the loving and familiar embrace of our Father’s love, well, what father won’t be filled with deep satisfaction and joy?

Related:
::  I quoted Brennan Manning
a couple days ago, too.
::  A
series based on the themes of Seismic Shifts begins this Sunday at Telkwa CRC.